This is a video from the first organised hip hop event in the UK. The graffiti side was represented by the Chrome Angelz. Rock City, London All-Stars, Live To Break, Look Twice, The B-Boys, Breakazoids and others were on the b-boy tip and Imperial Mixers were providing the music.

Thanks to Nick Dart.

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Best sleeve notes ever? These are from 1995 and from a London perspective they nail it.

Thanks to Adam Khan.

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Lovely day out today in Soho for me and the child (seen below rocking the New Era) at the Independent Label Market. This one was conceived by our friend Katy from Bang On PR (she’s the one doing the thumbs up at the bottom), and a friend, to celebrate independent record labels. The idea was that the labels themselves took stalls in Soho’s Berwick Street Market (with the odd florist and fish stall placed in between which was great) selling their own music. Labels taking part were Rough Trade, Heavenly, Peace Frog (soon celebrating their 20th anniversary), Moshi Moshi, Domino (who even even had a credit card machine), Mute, R&S, Wall Of Sound, Soul Jazz, Bella Union and XL.

Apparently at 10am the collectors were out in force and this carried on throughout the day. Mute’s stall was one of the best with great cakes, Daniel Miller signing copies of The Normal’s ‘Warm Leatherette’ and a coveted Mute synth (£50 to you guvnor) which one of our mates picked up. It was great to be able to buy a record from XL boss Richard Russell, Daniel Miller of Mute or Jeff Barrett from Heavenly and in general it showed a nice demand for the UK’s independently released music. Fair play to Katy and co for getting it together and fingers crossed it’s on next year.

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Prince interview by Carol Cooper taken from The Face in June 1983. Great photo. Just watched the Omnibus program on him from ’91 and it’s pretty amazing stuff. Sheila E and a tour of his house. What more could you want.

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Today me and the boy (my 13 year old son) visited the new Barbican exhibition. Apparently a lot of the work comes from the time that the downtown NY scene came together across the mediums of art, music, dance and architecture (often all in the same piece). By the way, excuse the bad iPhone photos below but you’re not really allowed to take them so you have to sneak the snaps.

From a music perspective there are some nice pieces to get into from Laurie Anderson. There is ‘The Handphone Table’ (above), a table where you place your elbows into small holes and place your hands over your ears so the sound of a poem travels through your arms. It’s a nice idea and you get more of a feeling of the poem being read, kind of blobs of sound, than are actually able to hear it.

Laurie Anderson also has an installation called ‘The Electric Chair’ where a Farfisa organ has a chord held by a heavy vice placed upon it, while two fluorescent lighting tubes and a spinning turning chair are all mic’d up to create an ever changing sculpture of light, crackles and movement. It’s nice. I think it was created for this exhibition and is based upon the above drawing.

One of our other favourite parts of the show was one of it’s centre points, Trisha Brown’s ‘Walking On The Wall’, which was originally created in 1971. Five dancers are suspended on the wall via a system of harnesses, ropes and a girder and move around two walls in a sort of geometric fashion – stepping over each other and walking backwards and forwards. It’s very peaceful to watch and in the boys words ‘though slow it’s pretty entertaining.’ The Guardian said ‘A walk on the wall side… This exhibition is worth the trip for Trisha Brown alone.’ Couldn’t agree more.

Another key piece of the show is Gordon Matta-Clark’s ‘Splitting’ where he took a house in New Jersey and in his words ‘does a dance with the building’. Slowly breaking it into two parts and pushing one part back on its own foundations. Special mention also to his lovely shots of 70s graffiti from the like of Lee (below). Apparently he had an affinity and solidarity with young people obsessed with defacing public property. I like him.

We’ve picked out the obvious parts of the show but there’s lots to get into and to me it felt like an important part of that musical lineage that we love.

For more information on dates, times and how to get there click here to go to The Barbican website.

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Classic stuff here from Arena Homme + in Winter/Spring 09/10 covering the work of the late Ray Petri. Buffalo is perhaps one of the finest styles ever to come out of London and be associated with club culture. The mix of sportswear and the likes of Armani looked fresh at the time and still do now. It’s a classic look and if you want to read more, well look at more, there is a great book published by Westzone named ‘Buffalo – The Style & Fashion Of Ray Petri’ containing loads of his work.













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Here’s a quality interview with Andrew Weatherall and Terry Farley about the history of Boy’s Own and the record label. Looks like it was done in the studio as they were recording the follow-up ‘Substance’. Weatherall dismisses techno in fine style, and the clip also features the videos for ‘Raise’ (as Terry calls it ‘a hillbilly balearic anthem for the summer’) and the Less Stress cover of ‘Don’t Dream It’s Over’. London attitude in full flow.

Thanks to Nick Dart.

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